Interview with Chris Manley and Jeff Seal – “Jeff and Buttons Entertain and Audience”

~ ~ ~

Jeff and Buttons Entertain an Audience

Bankrukt Productions

September 13 – 17, 2018

~ 43 Minutes ~

Created and performed by Jeff Seal and Chris Manley.

Jeff and Buttons (2 very funny jokesters) will entertain their audience by performing their new show entitled “Jeff and Buttons Entertain An Audience.” Their show consists of lots of new but also some old material which will be performed for an audience with the express purpose of entertaining said audience. It should be an entertaining night of performing!

“Jeff and Buttons had me laughing so hard that I was literally wheezing.” – The Happiest Medium

“Their material is so stupid it becomes profound and refreshing” – MaskedArts.com

For more information and/or tickets go here!

# # # # #

 

~ Interview with David Cale ~

This interview was originally recorded in Sept 2011 for Vaudevisuals.com.
I first met David Cale in 1982 performing at the Westbeth Theater Center’s Monday night show. He has gone into creating a diverse career for himself by writing and performing, singing and directing. I wanted to ask him about his work and what he is doing at this time in his life. Here is the video interview as he answers those questions.

Currently his play ‘Harry Clarke‘ is being performed by Tony Award winner Billy Crudup at the Minetta Lane Theater for ‘ten weeks only’.

ONE OF THE MOST EXHILARATING
THEATRE TRIUMPHS OF THE YEAR!– THE OBSERVER

 “David Cale…is a spellbinder. Fascinating as he is to watch, and exquisite as his verbal imagery can be, it is Cale’s gifts as a storyteller that hold an audience rapt.” Steven Winn/San Francisco Chronicle

Interview with playwright Brendon Cole and director Michael Di Jiacomo

Karen Jenson interviews playwright Brendon Cole and director Michael Di Jiacomo of “Imperfect Love” at The Connelly Theater. Closes Sunday 2/18/18.

IMPERFECT LOVE is a story of love and betrayal, set just over 100 years ago, between the actress Eleonora Della Rosa, and her playwright lover Gabriele Torrisi. (Inspired by the real-life relationship between the great Eleanora Duse and the poet D’Annunzio). It’s a story set at the turning of an epoch, and the turning of two styles of theater: the more visceral and emotional style that Eleonora and Torrisi are exemplars of, and the ‘new’ psychological style epitomized by Nordic writers like Ibsen and Strindberg. Our characters Eleonora and Torrisi are both vulnerable and aware that their day may have passed, and along with it, their love. Should Torrisi abandon Eleonora and strike out for a collaboration with her arch-rival, the Parisian Sarah Bernhardt? Should Eleonora withdraw her support (and love?) from the possibly outmoded Torrisi and try to work with up-and-coming Ibsen? In the middle of all this is the classically trained leading-man Domenica, who doesn’t know which way to turn in his professional life, or in the tangled world of his emotional allegiances. One other delight of the play is how the traditional clowns Beppo and Marco not only comment on the action in a comical and human way, but how they themselves also embody the conflicting epochs – the rambunctious farce of the Commedia dell’Arte, set against a premonition, a whiff of the bold futurism of a Beckett or a Pirandello, a modernism that will eventually make all earlier styles redundant. In the end, matters of theater and matters of the heart come together in a climax both affirming and bitter-sweet. The play’s the thing. At least, until the curtain falls.
Go here for more information.